Depression Accelerates Brain Aging (Don’t Let This Happen to You)

 

Untreated Depression Damages Your Brain

 

Psychologists at the University of Sussex have found a link between depression and an acceleration of the rate at which the brain ages.

Although scientists have previously reported that people with depression or anxiety have an increased risk of dementia in later life, this is the first study that provides comprehensive evidence for the effect of depression on decline in overall cognitive function (also referred to as cognitive state), in a general population.

For the 2018 study, published in the journal Psychological Medicine, researchers conducted a robust systematic review of 34 longitudinal studies, with the focus on the link between depression or anxiety and decline in cognitive function over time.

 

Evidence from more than 71,000 participants was combined and reviewed.

 

The study included people who presented with symptoms of depression as well as those that were diagnosed as clinically depressed, the study looked at the rate of decline of overall cognitive state — encompassing memory loss, executive function (such as decision making) and information processing speed — in older adults.

Importantly, any studies of participants who were diagnosed with dementia at the start of study were excluded from the analysis. This was done in order to assess more broadly the impact of depression on cognitive ageing in the general population.

The study found that people with depression experienced a greater decline in cognitive state in older adulthood than those without depression. As there is a long pre-clinical period of several decades before dementia may be diagnosed, the findings are important for early interventions as currently there is no cure for the disease.

 

The study found that depressed people experienced a greater cognitive decline than those without depression.

 

Chronic Depression Causes Brain Inflammation

 

 

Years of untreated depression may lead to neurodegenerative levels of brain inflammation. That’s according to a first-of-its-kind study showing evidence of lasting biological changes in the brain for those suffering with depression for more than a decade.

The study findings are from the same research team that originally identified a link between brain inflammation and depression. Along with subsequent research, the findings have started to change the thinking about depression treatments.

 

Over Time, Depression Alters The Brain

 

Evidence is increasingly pointing to the possibility that in addition to being a biological disorder with immediate implications, over time depression may also alter the brain in ways requiring different forms of treatment than what’s currently available.

This was a relatively small study of 80 participants; 25 had untreated depression for more than 10 years, 25 for less than 10 years, and 30 had never been diagnosed.

All were evaluated with positron emission tomography scans (PET scans) to locate a specific type of protein that results from the brain’s inflammatory response to injury or illness.

 

 

Throughout the body, the brain included, the right amount of inflammation protects us from disease and repairs us when we’re injured.

But too much inflammation leads to chronic illness, including heart disease and potentially neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

If long-term depression results in more inflammation, the researchers expected to find more of the protein in the brains of those who’d suffered from untreated depression the longest.

And that’s exactly what they found, with higher levels in a handful of brain areas, including the prefrontal cortex, the brain area central to reasoning and other “executive” functions, which is thought to be compromised by disorders like depression.

 

Level of brain inflammation correlates with duration of depression.

 

 

Inflammation Shared by Depression and Degenerative Disorders

 

 

If the results hold up (via more research with more participants), this will prove to be an important finding adding evidence to the argument that depression shares similarities with degenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s, changing the brain in ways research-to-date hasn’t fully grasped.

“Greater inflammation in the brain is a common response with degenerative brain diseases as they progress, such as with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease,” said senior study author Dr. Jeff Meyer of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) at the University of Toronto.

These findings build on a study published in 2016 showing that patients with depression had higher levels of C-Reactive Protein (CRP), another biological marker of inflammation, throughout the body than those not suffering from the disorder.

That was an observational study looking for a link between depression and inflammation (correlation not causation), but the results were significant. After adjusting for several factors, those with depression had CRP levels more than 30 percent higher than those without depression.

 

Unchecked Depression: Like a Neurodegenerative Disease

 

What the research seems to be collectively indicating is that we may need to change our thinking about depression and its effects.

The evidence affirms that depression truly is a biologically based disorder of the brain, and left unchecked, it may run a degenerative course that damages brain tissue in ways similar to other neurodegenerative diseases.

All of this places greater emphasis on the need to develop more effective treatments and, as urgently, work toward removing the stigma from those suffering.

 

Recommended Depression Treatment System

 

I recommend James Gordon’s Destroy Depression System, a comprehensive self-help program.

This system includes a step-by-step guide on exactly what you need to do to naturally and safely cure your depression  in just a few weeks – without any medication or expensive therapy sessions.

His website explains exactly why and how this system works.

 

Visit James Gordon’s Destroy Depression System to learn how it will heal your depression and read testimonials.

 

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